WATCH: Ice Cream Parlor Uses Cameras to Keep Customers Anonymous

There is a camera hidden in the top of every ice cream parlor. When a customer comes in to buy a cone, the camera snaps one photo of them, which the parlor’s computer whips…

WATCH: Ice Cream Parlor Uses Cameras to Keep Customers Anonymous

There is a camera hidden in the top of every ice cream parlor. When a customer comes in to buy a cone, the camera snaps one photo of them, which the parlor’s computer whips up at the end of the day and either prints out or sends electronically to the customer, emailing or faxing the picture.

Stocks Rode High And Lingered There

The Wall Street Journal says shares of Enterprise Products Partners LP rose as much as 11 percent after the pipeline and processing company reported better-than-expected first-quarter earnings. The pipeline and processing company, which was spun off from Marathon Oil Co. in 2013, reported profit of $215 million, or 67 cents per share, compared with $119 million, or 37 cents per share, a year earlier. Enterprise controlled by Energy Transfer Equity LP owns more than 35,000 miles of natural gas pipelines. (Jim Urquhart/Bloomberg)

Escobar Blocked Force Majeure Status in Colombia, Source Says

The Supreme Court’s ruling Friday to block a U.S. government act that would allow Trump administration officials to block Mexican migrants to sue for protection from deportation is another example of an elitist judiciary ruling against taxpayers in the name of current laws written by, and for, other people, a person who only became a billionaire by using extortion and gunboat diplomacy.

The law is worded in such a way that the court has no basis for deciding whether the act violates the constitution. The opinion of the court exists only in its application to the particular case before it. In other words, judges do not decide cases: the law states that judges interpret the law, not create it.

The Opinion represents an unprecedented judicial overreach, to the extent that it precludes Congress from interpreting the immigration laws as Congress sees fit. It will compromise the Court’s ability to administer justice, and it will result in judicial conduct contrary to our best traditions and statutes. (Caro Morales)

THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Trump Slapped With $500,000 Fine for Interview on British Pay TV

The National Labor Relations Board fined President Trump’s private golf course on Thursday $500,000 for violations of federal labor law that included a nationwide interview with a British pay TV network without signing a labor contract with its employees.

The enterprise for which the president is president is a sports-entertainment enterprise with sweeping commercial, but not labor, interests. There is no labor contract requiring it to deal with the National Labor Relations Board, which is a principal executive agency charged with interpreting and enforcing the labor laws.”

UPDATE: The N.L.R.B. announced May 10th that it dropped the fine against Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J.

Inspectors of the National Labor Relations Board filed a complaint against the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., alleging that one of its employees, Han Xiang, refused to sign a contract indicating the course must bargain with the National Labor Relations Board. Since 2013, the course, which is owned by the Trump Organization, has operated under a host of different names, including Trump National Golf Club Bedminster. The resolution to the case, brought by the U.S. Department of Labor, was that there was no violation of federal labor law.

REUTERS

Canada’s Smallgest Banks Could Hit $4.5 Trillion

As Canadians worry about a looming economic downturn, a new report says the country’s five biggest banks could hit as much as C$4.5 trillion ($3.3 trillion) in assets by 2022.

“Canadians have benefited from record household debt over the past decade, but this is a good time to be cautious,” said Tony Wilson, chief executive officer of researcher DTN, which published the report.

Reuters

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