Thought terrorists in Britain are already on the loose? You’re wrong

Those convicted in connection with a series of al-Qaida plots in Britain are likely to be freed in the next few months. Gary Gibson, a convicted terrorist, told reporters at the City of Westminster…

Thought terrorists in Britain are already on the loose? You’re wrong

Those convicted in connection with a series of al-Qaida plots in Britain are likely to be freed in the next few months.

Gary Gibson, a convicted terrorist, told reporters at the City of Westminster Magistrates’ Court in London Thursday that all of his convictions were subject to appeal and that, if they are upheld, they may be overturned. Gibson, 47, is serving five years after he pleaded guilty to three terrorism-related offenses — one terrorism offense under the Terrorism Act and two terrorism offences under the Northern Ireland Act.

Gibson refused to answer a number of questions from reporters and did not give his address. The Courthouse News Service wrote: “Asked if he intended to return to Afghanistan where he said he planned to fight with the Taliban, Gibson replied, ‘I don’t want to talk about the travel plans I have to and from Afghanistan.’ ”

The Crown Prosecution Service said in a statement that it would launch an appeal and that Gibson had denied during questioning in court the existence of an accommodation to take place.

It added: “Mr. Gibson said he was subjected to a forced disappearance. This was considered and ultimately was found not to be true. Mr. Gibson further denied allegations that he had been involved in trying to kill in the past.”

In 2012, Gibson said in an interview with the Sunday Times of London that he was the “ruler of the Taliban.” He told the newspaper that he had decided to become radicalized while working as a bouncer in London. In an interview, Gibson also said he did not expect the Britons to be executed.

“We are one of the only remaining few ‘power bases’ for the Taliban,” he said. “Every day there are police working around the clock to protect us. I can’t imagine the British government will fire us and hand the others over to other enemies. Even if that happens, we will fight them to the death.”

Gibson said he had plans to join the Taliban in Afghanistan, where he was making money fixing up cars, and that he had been planning to stay in the region for three years. But he said that would change.

“I am in two minds,” he said. “I think eventually the Taliban will bring down the regime and that we will remain. I fear they will kidnap me. But if the ‘stray dog’ killing goes through, I will have to leave. The training will have paid off. They will know all of my plans.”

In addition to the statements about the Taliban, Gibson gave details of his plans for establishing a worldwide terror network and said that he did not expect the al-Qaida attacks in the United States in 2001 to make a dent in the faith.

Gibson was described by his lawyers as a computer science enthusiast whose religious views were influenced by his Muslim father, who was arrested twice before but never convicted.

According to the police, Gibson belonged to a network of Muslims who developed a plan to leave Britain to create a global “mujahideen” network.

Leave a Comment