Migrants cross from Mexico into Guatemala, still unclear if they will gain entry to the United States

A group of mostly Honduran migrants crossed into Mexico at the municipal border crossing near Tapachula and headed to the Guatemalan border as promised on Monday. At least 300 people, including children and pregnant…

Migrants cross from Mexico into Guatemala, still unclear if they will gain entry to the United States

A group of mostly Honduran migrants crossed into Mexico at the municipal border crossing near Tapachula and headed to the Guatemalan border as promised on Monday.

At least 300 people, including children and pregnant women, reached the Tapachula crossing, according to local media reports. The first Spanish-language speakers from the caravan arrived in Tapachula on Saturday.

But many migrants are showing signs of frustration with Mexico and Mexican authorities, which made vague assurances that the migrants could continue north toward the United States but has largely ignored their requests for permission to do so.

“Our stay is not less than 30 days. We’re not leaving,” said Inubor Adan Gutierrez, 28, from Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital. Mr. Gutierrez said a bus had arrived in the border city to take people to the Guatemalan city of Tapachula, which has been holding more than 2,500 migrants.

Another volunteer who served meals said many migrants complained that they had not been given food, while a reporter for a local newspaper said many migrants were angry that they had not been given contact information to contact their relatives in the United States, adding that they did not intend to arrive in Tapachula.

“Our goal is to cross the border legally to the United States,” said Juan Jose Espinosa Cortes, a 32-year-old from Tegucigalpa. Mr. Cortes, who has one month of unemployment benefits and said his own salary was about $40 a week, said he was attracted to the caravan by the promise of $7,000 to $8,000 he could earn if he applied for asylum in the United States.

Rafaela Zaldivar, 19, a nurse from Cucuta, Colombia, told The Times that she got the idea to make the long trip to Mexico after she saw pictures on social media of others in the caravan.

“I’ve never been to Mexico. They promised we would not be forced back into Honduras,” she said.

The migrants got flustered when they were confronted by a protester at the Tapachula crossing who wanted to kick them from the top of a truck and said his purpose was to show Hondurans they would not be welcome in Mexico.

Asked whether he intended to stop them as an illegal immigrant, the man, who did not give his name, waved his hand and said, “I did not.”

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